Thursday, September 19, 2013

ARTFULLY AWEAR + PANTONE: Green Glow.

I decided to save the best for last in the final post in my Artfully Awear + Pantone series: my favorite dress and my favorite color.  Pantone's Green Glow is showcased by this Oscar de la Renta gown and captured by these tromp l'oeil paintings by Tauba Auerbach.


Born in 1981 in San Francisco, Auerbach now lives and works in New York City.  I first came across her work in Vitamin P2, one of my favorite painting books, and became better acquainted with her story via The Gentlewoman.

The canvases shown here are just one part of her artistic oeuvre, and I've found them extremely powerful in their use of the canvas as well as paint, to create a two-dimensional/three-dimensional dialogue.

The unique rumpled, wrinkled effect is achieved by folding or crumpling the canvas before stretching.  Finally, Auerbach adds paint using a spray gun.

According to Auerbach's profile on the website of the Whitney Museum of American Art, "By creating an object in which two supposedly discrete states—flatness and three dimensionality—are merged, Auerbach confronts the limitations between these states, revealing an ambiguity that is often overlooked."

I love the way the unique fabric of this dress holds beautifully imperfect wrinkles, and the color and texture reminded me of Auerbach's gorgeous canvases.

Auerbach will be signing a limited edition issue of The Thing Quarterly at the New York Art Book Fair this Saturday!  Details here.

Dress: Oscar de la Renta
Embroidered clutch: Vintage, belonged to my Grandmother
Shoes: Brian Atwood (also worn here for one of my most popular posts to date)

The Artfully Awear + Pantone series has been a dream for me.  One last thank you to Pantone for the opportunity!


Photos by Kathy Paciello.  Auerbach images from taubaauerbach.com, pictify.com, and wiels.org.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

WEARING: Evie Falci at MoMA PS1.

My outfit for the last Warm Up of the season at MoMA PS1 was inspired by Evie Falci's mesmerizing canvases.
The Brooklyn-based artist covers stretched denim with colorful rhinestones, studs, and beads, resulting in these bedazzled works, which she has said are influenced by optical dot paintings of Yayoi Kusama. See my Kusama-inspired outfit post here.

Falci has described her process as spider-like, slowly and meticulously working to create a web of color and texture.  These works the bedazzled interiors and portraits of Mickalene Thomas.

The works exist on multiple levels as craft, sculpture, and painting, and are nonrepresentational, the patterns flowing freely as Falci works, without underpainting or sketches.
Dress: Mara Hoffman
Sandals: Juicy Couture
Bag: Marc by Marc Jacobs (similar here)
Photos by Kathy Paciello; Falci images from artsy.net.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

ARTFULLY AWEAR + PANTONE: Blue Aster.


I'm picking back up with a brand new post in my series inspired by Pantone colors.  This time, it's the cool 18-4252 TCX Blue Aster, which is beautifully apparent in the accompanying paintings by Swiss artist Karina Wisniewska.





Born in 1966, Wisniewska was trained and performed as a chamber musician and concert pianist before discovering her love for the visual arts, including painting. 



For her, the act of painting in essence records a musical composition onto the canvas.  This ideal brings to mind the visual compositions of Wassily Kandinsky, who said:
Color is the keyboard, the eyes are the harmonies, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul.


Wisniewska's approach to painting is similar to Kandinsky's in that she equates strokes on the canvas with musical representation.  However there is very little formal similarity between the two artists' works.  


Wisniewska applies pigment to canvas using a brush or spatula and often mixes the paint with quartz sand in order to build up a surface.


When I forget what something is called and how I normally know it, that's when I begin to see. By keeping the wrist flexible and varying the pressure and speed, it is [possible] to draw a line without hesitation that will flow like a piece of music. --Karina Wisniewska


Necklace: H&M
Shoes: C'N'C Costume National (available here for 70% off!)

Photos by Meri Feir, images from 1stdibs.com, artnet.com, artsy.net, and karinawisniewska.com.


Sunday, September 1, 2013

ART TO WEAR: Palette.


Whet your palette on this kitschy clutch by accessories phenom Sophia Webster.
  I could post an entire Art to Wear series on her over-the-top shoes and bags for those who prefer to wear their creativity on their sleeve (or arms or feet, as it were).  I can't decide if I love it or hate it.  What do you think?