Thursday, August 23, 2012

CLARENCE COLES PHILLIPS


Last weekend was one of my favorite events of the year: the Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governors Island in NYC.  I wore a modern rendition of what a 1920s lady might wear to a daytime fête, and here is a look at my inspiration.


To get some ideas, I perused 1920s fashion plates, and came across the work of Clarence Coles Phillips (1880-1927).  


Phillips was an American illustrator, well-known for his watercolor images used in popular magazines such as Life and Good Housekeeping throughout the 1910s and early 1920s.


One of the most interesting aspects of his work is how the figure often disappears into the background, as though what she is wearing perfectly matches her surroundings.  


This device was known as the "fadeaway girl" and became a trademark of Phillips' work and also saved on printing costs.


Phillips' images of women served as both snapshots of life and fashion plates, and give a whimsical perspective of the style at the time.


I'm wearing a BCBG jumpsuit, hat from a street vendor, Betsey Johnson shoes, vintage purse and bracelet, and F21 necklace.


[Phillips photos from hemmings.com, oilpaintings-supplier.com, magazineart.org, and polarbearstale.blogspot.com.]

Friday, August 10, 2012

ART TO WEAR: Gerhard Richter



These Nicholas Kirkwood pumps are the unofficial shoe incarnation of Gerhard Richter's Abstraktes Bild 809-3 (1994).  I'd like to wear them with this dress.

Richter image from art observed.com

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

GEORGE BARBIER


The print of this dress from sheinside reminded me of Art Deco fashion illustrations, particularly those by French artist George Barbier.


Barbier (1882-1932) was a member of the Ecole des Beaux Arts, and was well-known during the first half of the 20th century for his fashion illustrations, costumes, and jewelry.


He was the leader of an artistic and stylistic collective called "The Knights of the Bracelet", who championed ostentatious dress.


I'm wearing a dress courtesy of sheinside.com and Carlos wedges.

[Photos by me; Barbier images from artophile.com.]